Running and Running: Easy and Painless Ways to Keep Up with Technology

Keeping up with legal technology sometimes reminds me of the lyrics of a Pink Floyd song: 

“And you run and you run to catch up with the sun but it’s sinking, 

Racing around to come up behind you again” 

Here are some resources to help you keep up with – and stay on top of – technology issues that affect lawyers personally and professionally.   

Any discussion of legal technology starts with the resources available with your SC Bar membership. If you haven’t checked out the Bar website in a while, I would encourage you to see what is new there. The Bar Technology Committee has assembled a tremendous amount of material on a wide array of tech topics at http://www.scbar.org/tech, including tech competency (with sections on basic computer skills and training resources). Additionally, the Practice Management Assistance Program (PMAP) has a wide range of helpful tech links and resources at http://www.scbar.org/pmap.  

The Bar eBlast newsletter contains regular, timely tech tips that you can use immediately. If you missed any, you can catch up with the eBlast archives on the Bar’s website. Every year, the Bar CLE Division increases its tech offerings, including full day CLEs featuring nationally recognized speakers. Additionally, the stable of on demand CLEs, including Tech CLEs, is always growing. 

If you are a cheapskate thrifty like me, and books are your preferred medium of learning, check out the Bar lending library (online list at http://www.scbar.org/lendinglibrary) which stocks books on practice management and technology from the ABA and other publishers. It has titles such as Cloud 3.0 | Drafting and Negotiating Cloud Computing Agreements, The Internet of Thing Legal Issues, Policy and Practical Strategies, and the 2019 Solo and Small Firm Legal Technology Guide. The Bar constantly updates the titles available, so it is worth checking the new titles periodically. New books are tweeted out @SCBar_PMAP. 

Most attorneys I know use email as their primary form of communication. If you don’t want to sign up for a bunch of newsletters, check out the Technolawyer website. There are several newsletters available, and during the week you will get a curated list of links to articles specifically related to legal tech and tech issues in general.  Most newspapers, magazines, and other news websites have a specific business newsletter available. For more tech related coverage, CNET, How-To-Geek, and Tom’s Guide are all excellent resources. For cybersecurity related coverage, Krebs on Security provides a lot of good information. The SANS.org site has several good newsletters. OUCH is probably the most useful and informative for most people with an interest in, or need to be generally aware of, security threats. For good tech deals for personal or business use, you can sign up for the Wirecutter Deals and CNET Cheapskate newsletters. 

If you enjoy reading blogs, Law Technology Today is a good place to start. It provides an excellent overview of technology issues and, as the title suggests, focuses on lawyers. The Lawsites blog from Bob Ambrogi tracks legal news, websites, and products, and the Ride the Lightning blog, written by Sharon Nelson, discusses ediscovery and information security.  They both provide digestible amounts of information. If you need some more ideas, the ABA publishes a list every year of the top 100 legal blogs.  

Podcasts are a great way to keep tabs on tech issues and developments. The Digital Edge is an outstanding podcast in which Jim Calloway and Sharon Nelson conduct interviews and discuss issues related to law and tech. Digital Detectives features Sharon Nelson (again) and John Simek discussing computer forensics, ediscovery, and information security issues. The Kennedy-Mighell Report, featuring Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell, considers how technology can help attorneys. All three of those podcasts are directed at attorneys and their hosts are nationally known speakers on legal tech topics.  (As an aside, Nelson and Simek will be speaking at the 2020 Bar Convention and I am as excited as a teenager in one of those old film clips of people watching the Beatles get off a plane.) 

Other cybersecurity centered podcasts include the Cyberwire, a podcast that will give perspective on the many and varied current threats that are out there. Hacking Humans does a great job educating about scams, social engineering, phishing schemes, and online criminal activity. Hosts Dave Bittner and Joe Carrigan make what can sometimes be a dry or overwhelming topic manageable and enjoyable, and it will help you become more aware of the dangers in the online world. The episode entitled “Just Because I Trusted You Yesterday Doesn’t Mean I Trust You Today” featured an interview with the IT director for an Orlando Florida law firm that thwarted an attempt to misdirect settlement funds by paying attention and using some common sense. Other good informative and entertaining podcasts are Reply All, Grumpy Old Geeks, and Clockwise. If you are more interested in legal management, systems, and technology, the Lean Law Firm (co-hosted by Dave Maxfield, SC Bar member and frequent CLE speaker) is worth a try.  

If you take a little time to avail yourself of the (mostly free) resources out there, you should have no trouble keeping up with technology that you use both personally and professionally. To quote GI Joe, “Knowing is half the battle.” 

By: Mike Polk, Chair
SC Bar Technology Committee
Belser & Belser, PA
Columbia, South Carolina